UN provides vital food and aid to 42,000 people in eastern Mosul

News Hour


In the single largest humanitarian aid delivery in eastern Mosul since the current conflict began, the World Food Programme (WFP), UNICEF and the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) yesterday provided food, dignity kits, water purification tablets, jerry cans, baby hygiene kits and more for 42,000 people in eastern Mosul. For the first time in over two weeks, security conditions have allowed humanitarian agencies to reach families living in the suburbs of eastern Mosul, many of whom are in desperate need of assistance.

As part of the interagency operation, WFP provided ready-to-eat food rations to meet the immediate food needs for six days for people living in eastern Mosul. UNFPA provided dignity kits for women, and UNICEF delivered one month’s supply of water purification tablets, high energy biscuits, jerry cans, baby hygiene kits and leaflets with information on child protection and basic mine awareness. The distribution took eight hours to safely gather families and provide them with food and humanitarian supplies.

“Access and security are the biggest concerns facing the entire humanitarian community trying to assist families affected by the conflict,” said Sally Haydock, Country Director and WFP Representative in Iraq. “WFP knows food is running out inside Mosul, and being able to assist so many families in need in eastern Mosul is a great relief.”

“I saw thousands of happy welcoming children today, it was a very large and important distribution which allowed us to reach more than 21,000 children in eastern Mosul,” said Bastien Vigneau, UNICEF’s Regional Emergency Advisor who coordinated the aid delivery. “Next, we need to focus on delivering longer-term services to these areas to restore acceptable living conditions for children there.”

“UNFPA is working around the clock to provide immediate relief to women and girls affected by the current conflict whenever security allows,” said Nestor Owomuhangi, UNFPA Deputy Representative. “The dignity kits that we have managed to distribute today to over 9,000 women and girls include feminine hygiene products, basic clothing like a dress and head cover. They offer more than the basic requirements as they allow women to take care of their well being and enable them to gain confidence to get out of their tents or houses to seek other available services.”

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