The $900,000 question behind Bob Dylan’s Nobel prize

News Hour:

The American singer-songwriter, a cultural icon of dissent and protest from the 1960s onward, has said nothing about the award announced two weeks ago. But under Nobel rules, the winner must give one lecture on literature – or in Dylan’s case even a concert – within six months to receive the $900,000 prize money.

Per Wastberg, a member of Swedish Academy that presents the award, has said that Dylan’s silence is “rude and arrogant”.

The Nobel Foundation does not accept any rejections of the prize – Dylan’s name will be listed as the winner in 2016 whatever he says. But the award money is a different matter , reports Reuters.

As a condition, Dylan must give a lecture on a subject “relevant to the work for which the prize has been awarded” no later than 6 months after Dec. 10, the anniversary of dynamite inventor Alfred Nobel’s death.

“That is what we ask for in return,” said Jonna Petterson, spokeswoman for the Nobel Foundation, adding Dylan could also opt to give a concert instead of a lecture. “Yes, we are trying to find an arrangement that suits the laureate (Dylan).”

The lecture need not be delivered in Stockholm. When British novelist Doris Lessing was awarded the Nobel literature prize in 2007, she was too ill to travel. Instead, she composed a lecture and sent it to her Swedish publisher, who read it out at a ceremony in the Swedish capital.

The Academy honored the 75-year-old Dylan for “having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition”.

Dylan’s songs, such as “Blowin’ in the Wind”, “The Times They Are A-Changin'”, “Subterranean Homesick Blues” and “Like a Rolling Stone” captured the rebellious and anti-war spirit of the 1960s generation and moved many young people later as well.

The Swedish Academy’s choice of Dylan drew some controversy with many questioning whether his work qualifies as literature, while others complained that the Academy missed an opportunity to bring attention to lesser-known artists.

Rafiuzzaman Sifat

Md. Rafiuzzaman Sifat, a CSE graduate turned into journalist, works at News Hour as a staff reporter. He has many years of experience in featured writing in different Bangladeshi newspapers. He is an active blogger, story writer and social network activist. He published a book named 'Se Amar Gopon' inEkushe boi mela Dhaka 2016. Sifat got a BSc. from Ahsanullah University of Science & Technology, Bangladesh. He also works as an Engineer at Bangla Trac Communications Ltd. As an avid traveler and a gourmet food aficionado, he is active in publishing restaurant reviews and cutting-edge articles about culinary culture.
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